28Nov

Five Tips for Making A Business Preparedness Plan

After a calamity, maintaining your business requires more than good fortune and hope for the best. When the unexpected occurs, a solid business preparedness plan may help you keep your doors open and resume regular operations.

Although nobody can anticipate whether or when a disaster will occur, it is preferable to take preventative measures to safeguard your business. Consider these five stages when building a business preparedness strategy and plan ahead:

1. Establish program management

Everyone on the premises, including people with disabilities, must have their physical safety considered part of your preparedness strategy. You’ll also want to create instructions for continuing business with minimal disruptions.

– Create a department or group that will be responsible for creating and updating your business continuity strategy.
– Set aside money for any backup plans the group comes up with. (This may involve discussing with your agent whether your small business insurance coverage meets your needs.)
– Determine any laws or corporate rules that might impact your plans.

2. Gather information about hazards and assess risks.

This should involve figuring out which events are more likely to happen in your areas, such as whether your company is situated in a flood or typhoon-prone area.

Do a business impact analysis to ascertain the likely effects of a business disruption. Then, examine and take into account strategies for risk reduction and loss mitigation.

3. Determine resources and train staff on how to implement those plans.

Make a plan to help ensure your business has all the resources it needs on hand by evaluating what resources you might need in the event of a disaster, from personnel to communications equipment to other needs.

In the event of an emergency, be prepared to communicate critical information to your staff, clients, and other stakeholders. Make a plan for how you’ll access your electronic data and information technology systems in the event of an emergency.

4. Conduct a test run.

To assess how well-versed and effective your employees are in the plan, conduct a variety of exercises. The evaluation of the established plans and procedures and the personnel training on their responsibilities may benefit from this phase.

5. Update and improve your plan based on the test run.

Review your plan bi-annually or once a year. Then, ensure your employees are reoriented with any changes in your plan. Keep in mind that any significant adjustments to the business or its personnel may necessitate a review of the emergency plan.

If you need additional coverage for disasters, taking note from the COVID years, we recommend getting in touch with us so we can help you find a plan that fits your evolving business needs in Hong Kong.

20Nov

Infographics: The State of AI in Business

The possibilities for how businesses communicate with their customers in real-time, manage their operations, and maintain business continuity during the pandemic are expanding thanks to AI capabilities. Companies are figuring out new ways to innovate and grow as technology develops.

Here are statistics on AI in terms of its use and value in business.

The state of AI in business infographicsWith the inevitability of AI growth and use in a business’ day-to-day transactions, it also asks whether enterprises are taking enough measures to protect themselves from liability while using AI.

If your need help finding liability insurance for your business in Hong Kong, connect with us today.

13Nov

Four Cybersecurity Outlook for Small and Medium Businesses in 2023

In the post-COVID-19 era, the market for cybersecurity insurance is anticipated to grow from US$ 11.9 billion in 2022 to US$ 29.2 billion by 2027, at a CAGR of 19.6%.

Cyber insurance will be bought by more SMBs than ever. Industry research found that only 15% of SMBs had purchased some form of cyber insurance, even though cybercrime was one of their top concerns. This means that for the foreseeable future, cyber insurance represents the single biggest growth opportunity for carriers, brokers, and MGAs.

According to a recent survey by Inc.com, which found that there are more than 30 million small top midscale businesses in the US alone, 77% of these companies believe that adopting technology throughout their company is a key factor in their growth.

Cyber insurance will be a part of every organization that depends on digital technology currently or in the future.

Here are four outlooks for cybersecurity in 2023:

1. Insurance companies will factor in a company’s existing (or non-existing) cyber security measures.

For carriers and policyholders that lack an active risk management system for these risks, the cost of mitigating and insuring data breaches and other cyber catastrophes will keep rising. For small and medium-sized firms, a cyber event often costs insurance more than US$150,000.

The average cost of a cyber incident for large businesses is around US$10 million. Carriers will demand more security from businesses to buy insurance to reduce those expenses and keep a successful book of business.

We predict that, at the very least, policies with limits of more than $500,000 will need to have anti-virus, firewall, two-factor authentication, backup, and encryption.

2. Companies that’ve already experienced data breaches will have a harder time finding a cyber insurance provider.

According to a recent report by the Government Accountability Office  (gao.gov), the increasing threat of a cyber breach will drive an upsurge in cyber insurance premiums while reducing availability.

In 2020, 47% more buyers chose cyber coverage, up from 26% in 2016. The cost of cyberattacks roughly doubled for American insurance companies between 2016 and 2019. And as a result, there was a significant rise in insurance prices. Due to the current shortage of insurance capacity in the market and the fact that many firms are unable to obtain cyber insurance at an acceptable price, costs are likely to increase.

3. Costs are projected to rise as a result of the market’s existing lack of insurance capacity and the fact that many businesses cannot find cyber insurance at a competitive price.

Brokerages must now be ready to discuss a packaged approach: a pre-placement cyber risk report, a competitive cyber insurance policy, and a platform that continuously monitors exposures throughout the policy’s lifetime and notifies the insured before a breach occurs. This will help clients avoid a price spike following a breach and a claim.

This strategy may lessen the need for some coverage restrictions or exclusions while preventing premium increases.

4. The adoption of AI-powered automated underwriting for cyber policies will keep expanding.

Providers can help their clients in getting the coverage they require, lower the chance of a breach, and prevent premium increases when carriers and MGAs use tested automated underwriting supported by tested technology. In order to provide the SMB market sector with a cyber insurance policy, automated data-driven solutions are essential.

If your business needs help finding the right cyber insurance, get in touch with us at Village Insurance Direct.

4Nov

Is there insurance for pilots who lose their license?

If a person finds themselves unable to work, they may be able to rely on income protection insurance for many various industries and forms of employment.

It’s not nearly that easy for pilots. You work in a dangerous sector as a pilot, facing several strains and difficulties that the general public is not exposed to. Your ability to perform your job depends on your mental and physical health. Ordinary protective items frequently don’t meet the special needs of pilots, calling for a higher level of protection.

Fortunately, there is an insurance policy that can cover pilots who lose their license to fly in Hong Kong.

Pilot’s Loss of License insurance is designed specifically to meet the needs of pilots and aircrew, eliminating many of the usual problems that pilots run into with more conventional forms of insurance, such as Disability Income Protection or Critical Illness coverage.

These plans are available for individuals or employers needing cover for their entire team. There are other insurance options that can be used to “top up” any existing Loss of License insurance you may already have.

Specific plans can cover the following:

– Commercial Pilots
– Airlines and Pilot Unions
– Student Aviators and Instructors

Plans for pilots who lose their licenses in Hong Kong can be tailored to your unique needs. A pilot’s loss of license insurance coverage may provide the following benefits:

– Monthly Expense for Temporary Loss of License
– Lump Sum Payment for Permanent Loss of License
– Mental Wellness Cover
– Drug and Alcohol Illness Cover
– Worldwide cover

Annual premiums for a Pilot’s Loss of License Insurance can range from US$2500 to US$6300, depending on certain factors and add-ons.

If you’d like to know more about this type of insurance, get in touch with us at Village Insurance Direct. We find the best personal and business insurance for expats in Hong Kong.