4Sep

4 Ways to Know If You Have Enough Life Insurance

Thinking about death and what happens to the family we will leave behind is not really an experience we want to go through. However, practicality encourages us to do so, specifically if we’re talking about the financial aspect of it.

Most of us are not prepared for death. Besides not having our will ready, we also don‘t have enough insurance coverage to take care of our loved ones in case of our untimely death.

Some of us think that life insurance is enough to take care of the expenses that our family may incur after our death. But is that really enough?

Life insurance is important, but it will never be enough to fully cover the financial needs of our family. There are a lot of factors that come into play when we die. And this includes:

the funeral and burial expenses
debts and other financial responsibilities
and even the lifestyle that our loved ones will have to adjust to

Funeral and burial expenses are one of the major expenses that a family will have to shoulder after the death of a family member. In Europe, the average funeral cost is around5,000. So, how much life insurance is enough?

Here are ways to calculate it:

METHOD 1: 6x to 10x annual earnings

A suitable sum for life insurance, according to the majority of insurance firms, is six to 10 times the yearly earnings. If you multiply your annual earnings by ten, you would choose coverage of $500,000 if it were $50,000. Some suggest increasing the coverage over the 10x threshold by an additional $100,000 per child.

METHOD 2: Years before retirement

Multiplying your yearly income by the number of years until retirement is another method for determining the required amount of life insurance. For instance, a 40-year-old would require $500,000 in life insurance (25 years x $20,000) if their current annual income is $20,000.

METHOD 3: Standard of living

The standard-of-living approach is based on how much money surviving family members would require to maintain their quality of living in the event that the insured party passed away. That sum should be multiplied by 20. The idea is that survivors can invest the death benefit capital and earn 5% or more while taking a 5% annual withdrawal from the death benefit, which is equal to the standard-of-living amount. The term “human life value (HLV) approach” is occasionally used to describe this kind of calculation.

METHOD 4: DIME

The DIME method is an additional approach (debt, income, mortgage, education). This is designed to provide just enough insurance to pay for the family’s costs in the case of an untimely death. Using the DIME method, you should have enough coverage to pay off all of your debts, including your mortgage, cover the cost of your children’s schooling, and replace your income for however many years it takes for your children to reach the age of 18.

It is crucial to understand how much and what kind of life insurance you require if you do. For the majority of people, renewable term insurance is enough, but you must consider your unique circumstances. To prevent being stuck with insufficient coverage or paying for pricey coverage that you don’t need, decide on what you’ll need in advance if you decide to purchase insurance from an agent.

Do your study to make sure you buy the greatest life insurance you can since knowledge is key to making the right decision in both investing and life insurance. Find and contrast life insurance quotes to see which one would best meet your specific requirements.

3Jul

Life Insurance in Your 30s and the Pandemic

If you’re like most people, you probably don’t think about life insurance very often. It’s one of those things that’s easy to put off until later. But if you’re in your 30s, it’s actually a good time to start thinking about life insurance.

How much insurance do you need for 30 year old?

2 Types of Life Insurance

There are two main types of life insurance:

1. Term life insurance and whole life insurance – life insurance is for a specific period of time, usually 10-20 years.

2. Whole life insurance is for your entire life.

Most life insurance experts recommend buying term life insurance in your 30s. Term life insurance is more affordable than whole life insurance, and it gives you the flexibility to change policies as your needs change over time.

When you’re in your 30s, you’re likely to have more financial responsibilities than you did in your 20s. You may have a mortgage, car loans, student loans, and credit card debt. You may also have a family – which means you need to think about how they would cope financially if something happened to you.

Life insurance can give you peace of mind knowing that your loved ones will be taken care of financially if something happens to you.

3 How Much Life Insurance Do You Need?

 

How much life insurance you need depends on your individual circumstances.

Some factors to consider include:

– Your current income and whether or not you have dependents
– Your debts and other financial obligations
– The cost of living

The Cost of Life Insurance in Hong Kong

Life insurance premiums in Hong Kong are determined by a number of factors, including your age, gender, health, lifestyle and the type and amount of cover you choose.

For example, life insurance for smokers will generally be more expensive than for non-smokers.

The best way to find out how much life insurance you need is to speak to a life insurance advisor.

According to the Life Underwriters Association of Hong Kong, the average cost of life insurance for a 30-year-old man is HK$2,700 per year, and for a 30-year-old woman, it is HK$2,040 per year.

However, life insurance premiums can vary widely depending on your individual circumstances.

The best way to find out how much life insurance you need is to speak to a life insurance advisor. They will be able to assess your individual needs and recommend the best policy for you.

Life Insurance with Pandemic Protection

In these uncertain times, it’s more important than ever to make sure you and your loved ones are protected. Life insurance can give you peace of mind that if the worst happens, your loved ones will be taken care of financially.

Many life insurance policies now come with pandemic protection, which means that if you die as a result of infectious disease, your family will still receive a pay-out. This can provide vital financial security at a time when it is needed most.

COVID-19’s long-term consequences are yet unknown, but we can’t overlook its financial and economic impact. Your money has now become your most valuable asset. Consider if you had to deal with the loss of your job or a medical catastrophe suddenly.

Working through the tough times is only half the battle. The other half concerns life insurance, which protects your savings as you work on paying for these unanticipated expenses. It also ensures that your finances will not be ruined by a single calamity.

The cost of added pandemic protection can range from a 5% to 35% increase depending on your current health status.

So, if you’re thinking about taking out life insurance, or if you’re not sure if you have enough cover, now is the time to speak to a life insurance advisor. They will be able to assess your individual needs and recommend the

8Oct

5 Personal Insurance You Need Plus Pro-Tips Before You Buy

It’s impossible to eliminate all risks from a single insurance plan. However, layering your personal finances with a handful of essential covers immensely help with risks.

So what are the important insurance types you need to protect yourself and your family?

  1. HEALTH INSURANCE

There is a multitude of insurance plans to help you with the cost of healthcare. Health insurance takes care of hospital costs when you’re sick or in an accident. Most will acquire this type of insurance through an employer. Self-employed individuals will have to get this from the open market on their own.

Pro-tip on what to consider:

– Cost of premium
– The amount of deductible (out-of-pocket cost before the insurance comes in)
– Co-payment amount (the amount paid for a particular visit)
– Co-insurance (cost divided between you and the provider)
– Cap out-of-pocket cost (maximum cost before the insurance starts)

An important thing to remember when shopping for health insurance is that you should be aware of your anticipated health needs so that you can check if it’s part of the plan. So if you have a history of heart condition in the family or cancer is involved, be sure to find a plan that will assist with the cost of those specific conditions.

  1. LIFE INSURANCE

Life Insurance Tip from Village Insurance: How much life insurance do you need?

There are two main types of Life Insurance: 

(1) Permanent Life Insurance – covers your lifetime
(2) Term Life Insurance – covers a certain period of time (e.g. 30 years)

Pro-tips: Term Life Insurance is generally more cost-effective because it protects you for a period when you’re least likely to die. This is, of course, if you get the plan at an early age.

In terms of the cost (how much you need to have covered), Village Insurance will always advise clients to consider their annual income. So if you need to replace your entire income, then you will need 25x your annual salary which is understandably a substantial amount. A positive outlook while thinking of that amount is that your family can withdraw around 4% from that amount for as long as the insurance is in place. If you want to replace an amount that covers certain things such as the mortgage, then you’ll need less.

  1. DISABILITY INSURANCE

This insurance plan also comes in two variants:

(1) Short term – for medical emergencies that prevent you from working (e.g. having a baby)

(2) Long term – for events that inhibit you from making a living for months or years.

When do you need short term disability Insurance? Blog: Village Insurance Direct

Pro-Tips: Short-term disability becomes quite handy when your employer doesn’t offer paid maternity at work. To determine how much you need, make a budget plan for the amount you’ll need while you’re unable to work.

Also, keep in mind that long-term disability insurance has a 3-4 month waiting period before it begins replacing lost income. On top of running through a budget plan for how much you’ll need, check if your plan is subject to taxes as well as your condition’s impact on your social security disability income.

  1. DENTAL INSURANCE

Health insurance plans do not automatically cover dental. Dental care can be quite expensive especially in Hong Kong. Treatments beyond preventative procedures can cost thousands of dollars. Teeth implants and other restorative treatments are often overlooked but once they’re there, you’ll be glad to have dental insurance when you see the cost per visit.

Pro-tip: Get dental insurance before you actually need it, meaning, get it while you’re young. Premium will cost less. Also, like some insurance covers, there may be a waiting period for expensive treatments so add that into consideration when scheduling your appointment.

  1. HOMEOWNER’S/RENTER’S INSURANCE

How to choose renters insurance and home insurance. Pro tip from Village Insurance Direct

Homeowner’s insurance covers both the house and all its contents. On the other hand, renter’s insurance covers what’s inside the rented space. 

Renter’s Insurance is a must-have in Hong Kong. Some landlords may even ask for additional liability insurance from renters to cover the entire building in case of damage.

Pro-tip: There are plenty of reasonably priced renter’s policies in the market (some as low as $20 monthly). Village Insurance recommends getting this so you won’t have to worry about damages to the apartment that are beyond your control such as a fire. 

For homeowner’s insurance, check your policy if it covers the current value of the property or the replacement value. You may also look for a plan that has add-ons to cover the cost of high-value items inside the house (e.g. jewellery, computer equipment).

Again, layering your finances with different insurance policies to take care of anticipated needs is the best way to protect you and your family from extreme loss of income. 

Get in touch with us if you need help finding specific personal as well as business insurance while you’re staying in Hong Kong.

 

17Mar

4 Financial Lessons from Covid 19

This year has challenged businesses and our personal finances. Job loss and diminished profits will affect the next couple of years (maybe more for some) and recovery is crucial. Of course, this is not the first economic downturn we’ve faced but it’s certainly significant because it’s on a global scale. 

Furthermore, the changes brought about by the pandemic not only affected people’s finances but there’s also the factor of lifestyle and the general way of how everyone “normally” went about their lives.

Now that we’ve watched this year play out and its end just around the corner, what can we do to position ourselves in a more crisis-ready strategy for our finances?

Here are the financial lessons we’ve learned from Covid 19:

HAVE A COMPREHENSIVE FINANCIAL PLAN

Have a comprehensive financial goal.

These plans should include:

– Long term and short term financial goals
– Milestones
– Contingency plans

It’s not enough to be able to pay our bills and run a business. Not losing money every month may give the misconception of stability but it’s important to have set goals to work towards a higher level of security.

Be specific about goals such as having both health and life insurance in place before the age of 35 to avoid higher premiums. 

Another example would be finding the solution for events like losing 15%, 30%, or 50% of your income. (Hint: Loss of Income insurance may help)

It’s these specific goals that prevent us from being too anxious about sudden events such as this pandemic. Financial goals provide us with better foresight of where the gaps are so we can fill them as quickly as possible.

HAVE 3 TO 6 MONTHS’ WORTH OF EMERGENCY FUND

Save up 3 to 6 months worth of income

Save up money that’s worth three to six months before paying off debt. Having this safety net allows us to support ourself during uncertain times like job loss or low sales in business.

Once you start doing this, it’s also good to add two months each year to get to a total of one year’s worth of emergency savings. That will come as a huge advantage when coupled with unemployment insurance because it can further extend to over a year.

FIND MULTIPLE INCOME SOURCES

This doesn’t necessarily mean having two fulltime jobs. But it can help to explore part-time gigs that will not require too much out of our mental bandwidth. Perhaps a hobby could also become profitable. Having an alternative stream of income can be helpful in case we lose employment.

This pandemic has given rise to plenty of virtual work and it’s an opportunity to find an additional source of money to reach our financial goals much faster. 

Putting money in low or medium-risk investments is also be worth exploring especially if there’s stagnant money in our savings account.

FINANCIAL STABILITY FIRST, DEBT PAYMENT SECOND

Be financially stable first before becoming debt free

Debt can be negotiable because institutions will have mitigation departments to allow debtors to find workarounds when unable to pay. Banks and other lending institutions also want to be paid back so foreclosure would be counter to them in many cases.

This is why gaining stability is more important to achieve first than paying off debts. A more productive way of looking at this is being debt-free is one of the tools in gaining stability. 

One may not have any debts now but if there’s no income coming in, that still puts that person in a stressful position. Having the money to pay for basic living expenses such as food, shelter and clothing are the top priority. 

These four lessons apply even during normal circumstances but more so now that we see how a global crisis highlights our financial blindspots. 

 

Need help with personal or business insurance in Hong Kong? We help expats find comprehensive plans for every need.

 

12Dec

Money-saving tips for new graduates

Ah, yes. Graduation.

Finally!

Independence!

Freedom!

The world is your oyster…if only you had the money.

Graduation creates this illusion of immortality for fresh graduates, especially for those belonging in Asian or other conservative families wherein they usually live with their parents or remain tethered financially until they hold a job of their own. So, the moment that the diploma is received, a surge of energy initiated by a newfound sovereignty course through their veins.

It makes sense though. You’re a youngblood with high hopes and dreams, you’re seeing the world beyond the books for the first time. You don’t have a curfew, homework, or a parent to answer to.

All of this rush of adrenaline doubles that moment you get employed because job equals money equals “add-to-cart”, right?

For a moment, there is harmony in your cash-ins and cash out. But at one point, maybe on the day when your employer can’t give your salary on time or when somebody gets sick, you’ll realize that you do not have a cent in the old piggy bank. Then, the reality of adulthood sets in. It’s time to decrease the “YOLO” and start saving.

Here are some tips money-saving (and maybe even earning) tips for all our fresh graduates out there:

1)   Invest

While having saved money in your account is good, placing them in good investment is better. Rather than letting them just stay in your account until your next impulsive buy, why not make them do the earning for you? Aside from insurance companies, some banks provide services on investments wherein you can start small, just enough for the entry-level salary.

2)   Wants and needs

Do you need another pair of shoes for work? My Economics professor once told the class, “If you can distinguish your wants from your needs, then saving is easier.” and that is financial wisdom I still hold today.

Needs which are your basic food and drinks, toiletries, clothes.

Wants are your 5-star meals with a bottle of champagne, Jeju face masks, and plain, white shirts that cost five digits.

Always reflect before you buy: “Need or want?”

3)   Allocate

Once you fully recognize your needs, you need to be very familiar with your cash flow and where to place them. It is important to list down the daily, weekly, and monthly expenses so setting a budget is easier.

4)    Something on the side

If you have an 8-hour job, especially one that keeps your weekends open, I would encourage having a sideline. Something non-committal, that you can do from the comfort of your home and that will take only a few hours of your time. It can be writing, copyreading, editing pictures, translating, even online tutorials.

There are such jobs out there.

Once you receive your pay, keep it safe. Don’t spend it. That’s your side hustle money.

When you’re a young investor, it doesn’t hurt to earn a bit more cash.

5)   Be wary of your circle

Friends and workmates are a great influence even in young adulthood and, sometimes, when one of them declares a night out or a trip to somewhere pricey, it’s difficult to say no.

There’s nothing wrong if your friends have more money than you, just as there’s nothing wrong if you have less money than your friends. But it’s important to remember at which part of the spectrum you are, and not get carried away. Also, be mature enough to not be insecure about the financial differences that you feel the need to spend money like them to achieve validation.

Learn to decline when it no longer hits your budget. If your friends are really good people, they’ll respect that.

6)   Splurge money

As contradicting as it is, it’s also important to spoil yourself every once in a while.

Have “splurge piggy bank” and invest a fixed portion of your savings to it.

It can be money for a concert happening in a few weeks or a monthly shopping spree/fancy dinner dates for yourself.

The point is, you have to spend money on you too. Sometimes, we impulse buy because we’ve been deprived for so long. So, it’s just better to just have a controlled source of cash for an “I deserve this” splurge. Just make sure that the “I deserve this” days aren’t every day.

7.) Get insurance early.

If you buy permanent life insurance early, this gives you a longer period of time to put money into the insurance plan and also allows you to draw interest on your money for a longer period of time. We help expats in Hong Kong find the best personal insurance. Get in touch with us today.

12Jun

Why More People are Choosing to Travel Alone

Traveling solo at least once in your life can be one of the most liberating and eye-opening experiences. The Internet has changed the culture of travel by becoming a platform for awareness of different exotic places as well as increased the urge to share our personal lives with friends and strangers. A large group of the expat community in Hong Kong live this kind of life and they would be the first people to attest to the value of exploring new territories on your own.

We are only young and strong once in our lives and getting invaluable life lessons by traveling is a chance we should take when it presents itself. So why are more people traveling solo?

1.       You have no one to worry about but yourself.

The comfort of having zero responsibility to anyone is a needed break from our busy work lives. This makes it easy for you to plan your journey and you have the freedom to make any change without a second thought. Do everything you want and nothing you don’t want.

2.        Experience real local life.

Traveling with other people does not often elicit a need to dive deeper into a country’s local culture because you already have people you can talk to and engage. However, being alone in an unfamiliar place pushes you to connect with your immediate community because these are the people you can possibly turn to in case you need help. You are also more uninhibited about impressions towards you because no one really knows you. Learn the language, break your routines, live a different life.Quote_imge_2,1

3.       Make new friends, or don’t.

Meet fellow expats and travelers or choose to be antisocial. It’s really all up to what you feel like doing. Hunt for hole-in-the-wall cafes and enjoy being with your own thoughts or go out at night and create a new network of interesting individuals at your own pace.

4.       It makes you more resourceful and confident.

Leaving your comfort zone increases your threshold. Hesitation is normal especially for anyone doing it for the first time but once you find yourself backpacking through the countryside or ordering your meal with broken local language, your self-assurance instantly gets a boost and you will discover things about yourself you have not yet realized. Most expats have said that after their first solo trip, they made sure that they would be able to do it again.

5.       The trip is more profound.

Whether you hated the place you visited or fell in love with the country and the people, the experience is an unforgettable one mainly because it’s solely yours. The satisfaction of checking off an item from your bucket list and having done so on your own is incomparable.

Make plans, break itineraries and gain more perspective from people and places. Try it at least once. And if you do decide to go for it, don’t forget to secure proper Travel Insurance for yourself. Get a Third Party Comprehensive Travel Insurance Plan to get covered for more risks—from loss baggage to repatriation in case of any medical emergencies. We can help.

Good luck and safe travels!

30May

Expat Guide: What to Do in Your First Year in Hong Kong

After living in Hong Kong for one year, you probably already know its famous landmarks and where to find the best Chinese food like the back of your hand. But here are more things you might need to know to settle in nicely and comfortably for the rest of your stay in this thriving, cultured, and fast-paced city.

buying car

  1. Owning/leasing a car and getting a driver’s license
Many Hong Kong residents don’t really consider a car a necessity. The city is small and the public transportation system is renowned for its cleanliness and efficiency. But some expats still feel incomplete without a vehicle. If you have a family or if you’re living in the New Territories, having your own car does have its advantages. You can set your own schedule of coming and going and if you want to relax, a drive to the rural areas to go biking or hiking is made much easier.
If you do decide to get a car, you’ll need a locally-issued driver’s license as your foreign issued license is only good for a year. Here’s what you need in order to be issued with a 10-year Hong Kong license:
  • The current fee
  • The originals, AND copies of, your home license, passport, and HKID card
  • Those over 70 years of age must complete medical form TD256
  • Proof of address, no older than 90 days
You will need to have resided in the country of issue for at least six months since your license was issued, you have held the license for at least five years, and present your passport issued in the same country as the license.

bank account

2. Opening a bank account
If you haven’t opened a bank account in Hong Kong yet, now’s as good a time as any! It’s a straightforward process and being a major international finance center, nearly all major banks are found in Hong Kong. All you’ll need is your passport and a recognized proof of address although some banks may need to see a work or residence permit. If you already have your HKID, this can be used instead of your passport. If your work requires you to travel a lot, HSBC and Standard Chartered are the best banks to accommodate you.

hiking

3. Nature trails and beaches

Of course there’s more to Hong Kong than just the hustle and bustle of business. If you love the great outdoors and yearn to get away from the big city often, Hong Kong has such easy access to nature. Hike the high peaks of Lantau to get a stunning view from the top. Find secluded beaches in Sai Kung and rent kayaks by the hour and revel in the tranquility you can find in such a major city.insurance_0

4. Getting health insurance
After living a year in Hong Kong, you’ll start to get a feel if it’s the right place for you. The city attracts expats because of its unique marriage of Western and Eastern cultures and the great work opportunities it offers. The food is nothing short of amazing and there’s always something to do whether its a fun night out in the city or a quiet drive to the south. If you decide to stay in Hong Kong, you’ll enjoy it so much more with the peace of mind knowing you have health insurance. We can help you get started on the health care that is best for you and your family. Your great new life in Hong Kong is about to begin!
Sources:
4Feb

Do I Need Life Insurance After Retirement?

Retirement does not always equate to having financial stability. A few possible circumstances that leaves you in this kind of situation are:

Forced retirement

Failed investments

Providing financial support for an aging family member or children who are still living at home

If you find yourself in debt or  responsible for someone’s well-being, then the short answer to the question is, “YES” you need life insurance even after retirement.

HOW MUCH INSURANCE DO I NEED?

It’s important to evaluate where you stand financially upon retirement. How much are your monthly expenses? Are there federal or state taxes that need to be paid? There are also things like probate costs, administration costs; there might be final debt or a mortgage on house, too. So as long as there is some type of financial exposure, you need life insurance to match up with that.

CAN I STILL GET INSURED AFTER RETIREMENT?

Yes. Of course, premiums will be higher which is why it’s advisable to get life insurance cover as early as your 20s or 30s. The greatest value of life insurance after retirement is that surviving family members or your spouse is left with financial security after the insurance holder’s death.

WHAT OTHER BENEFITS ARE THERE IN GETTING INSURANCE AFTER RETIREMENT?

Other benefits is that you can use the sum to help you pay for medical expenses–this is if you feel that you will no longer need the death benefit. This is called the accelerated death benefit provision. You have the option of choosing permanent life insurance to have money safely tucked away with zero risks.

You may also need to think about getting health insurance since more seniors are prone to health complications–thus more spend on medical needs. Although Hong Kong has a wonderful healthcare system, retirement will most likely lead to more trips to the hospital and getting more prescription drugs to maintain your health.

Ask us about more details on life insurance or health insurance or email us at info@villageinsruancedirect.com.

 

17Apr

What Insurance Do I Need Abroad?

Living a nomadic life can be an exciting one. The culture of traveling and living in a country other than your own is now more than just a trend but a life choice for many individuals and whole families.

On top of the usual preparations of finding a place to live, knowing where and how to reach the expat community and learning the culture of the country, you also need to make the necessary arrangements to prepare for the unexpected; health emergencies, financial fallbacks and other similar concerns.

The key feature of a good insurance for expats is mobility. Your insurance needs to follow you wherever you are. The second feature of a good expat insurance is that the benefits cover you and your family regardless if you are in the same country or not. And while it is seen as an added expense, the benefits certainly outweigh the costs because being far away from your country and the usual advantages that are given to its citizens may not be the same for every place.

Must-Have Personal Insurance

HEALTH INSURANCE

As an expat in Hong Kong, the number one type of personal protection we recommend is proper health insurance. Public healthcare in Hong Kong is one of the best in the world, however, it may not guarantee immediate and full care if you’re also waiting in line with many others who are also subscribing to public hospitals.

We wrote about the medical charges to expect in Hong Kong and compared the costs and benefits between private and public hospitals. This can give you a general idea of why you need private health insurance in case of emergencies.Remember that  the costs of even minor or routine medical treatment can quickly mount up. A benefit you must make sure is included is transport to a specialist unit and repatriation. You can lower your premium by opting to pay for any excess.

Critical Illness Insurance is also something for expats to consider if they are prone to serious ailments like cancer, heart attacks and other related diseases. Benefits of this policy will pay for therapy, drugs and other maintaining treatments. Some insurance policies may even cover death which means your families are left with a lump sum to pay for medical bills left behind.

We can help you find the right expat health insurance.

INCOME PROTECTION

This type of insurance can either be offered as a benefit along with your employment or you may choose to get one for yourself. This insurance ensures you have a monthly source of income in case you get into an accident or become gravely ill that you aren’t able to work for a period of time. We’ve also created an infographic showing How Income Protection Insurance Works. More importantly, this insurance takes care of your family when you temporarily cannot do so. We strongly recommend this to expats with children. Get in touch with us if you’re interested to see what options are available in Hong Kong.

LIFE

There are a number of good, affordable international life insurance policies for expats. This is usually a combination of two or more benefits such as critical illness plus total and permanent disability. It’s best to buy life insurance while you’re young because premiums are a lot cheaper. You can pay as little as US$33 a month and be covered for 20 years. We can also help find an insurance that suits your lifestyle and budget.

Remember that you need an insurance policy that is able to change as your circumstances change. Cost of premiums is also a crucial factor to consider so take your time when shopping for a provider. Evaluate your needs and determine your plans on a yearly perspective to see any drastic changes.